Steroid injection after cataract surgery

Primarily talk to us about it before choosing a treatment for your CTS. Try to find out as much as possible about the injection to which you reacted. These injections contain different steroids, varying or no local anaesthetic and other chemicals such as stabilisers and preservatives. For example, the commercial preparation 'Kenalog' used in this area contains not only the steroid (Triamcinolone acetate), but also sodium chloride, benzyl alcohol, carboxymethylcellulose sodium, polysorbate 80 and either sodium hydroxide or hydrochloric acid used to balance the pH (acidity). You may have had an allergic reaction to one of the other components of the injection or you may have reacted to one of the synthetic steroids which are not native to the human body. It does not necessarily follow that you would also react to a different preparation so knowing exactly which preparation you have had a reaction to is a vital piece of information.

Once positioned appropriately by your doctor, a fluoroscope (X-ray guided machine) assists in identifying the specific area to be injected. The area is then cleansed and the skin is numbed. The needle is inserted under X-ray guidance into the epidural space (the small space surrounding the nerves inside the spinal canal). A special X-ray dye will be used to verify that the needle has been correctly placed and that the medication will be delivered to the appropriate site. A long-acting anti-inflammatory steroid and local anesthetic are usually administered and the needle is removed.

The procedure for injection therapy is uncomplicated and well established. The object is to inject the corticosteroid preparation with as little pain and as few complications as possible. The technique is similar for muscle, periarticular, or articular injections. Selection of the site and careful attention to surface and deep anatomy are of paramount importance. [ 20 ] Injections in the vicinity of known nerve or arterial landmarks should not be attempted. For example, a lateral epicondyle injection is relatively easy. An injection into at the medial epicondyle (near the ulnar nerve) carries greater risk, and extra care must be taken to identify the nerve, outline its course, and avoid it.

In some instances, your specialist may recommend that you undergo an injection of gentamicin into the middle ear instead of a steroid. Gentamicin is an antibiotic which is known to have mildly toxic effects on both the balance and hearing parts of the ear, although its toxic effects on the vestibular system are very much more potent than on the hearing. Despite this, there is an increased chance of a hearing loss occurring with intratympanic gentamicin injections. For this reason, they are usually reserved for patients with a pre-existing severe hearing loss at the time the vertigo is diagnosed.

Steroid injection after cataract surgery

steroid injection after cataract surgery

In some instances, your specialist may recommend that you undergo an injection of gentamicin into the middle ear instead of a steroid. Gentamicin is an antibiotic which is known to have mildly toxic effects on both the balance and hearing parts of the ear, although its toxic effects on the vestibular system are very much more potent than on the hearing. Despite this, there is an increased chance of a hearing loss occurring with intratympanic gentamicin injections. For this reason, they are usually reserved for patients with a pre-existing severe hearing loss at the time the vertigo is diagnosed.

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